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Northwestern University

Meet the Weinberg College Advisers

Christine Bell

E-mail: cbell@northwestern.edu

Christine Bell is a College Adviser, Lecturer in the Department of Art History, and Associate Master of the Cultural and Community Studies Residential College. She was awarded her PhD from Northwestern’s Department of Art History in 1996, and has taught art history here as a graduate student as well as a full-time faculty member. She has also been on the faculty at the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana and at Lake Forest College. Professor Bell’s scholarly interests are in nineteenth century American art; early photography; art and war; and public art. She is presently at work on a manuscript about the visual culture of the Civil War—specifically the political enlistment of art in sectional conflict—and is continuing a long-term project of cataloguing Evanston’s public art. Presently her efforts have been focused on preserving 1930’s-era art in Evanston public schools. Before making the career change to art history, Professor Bell had many different work experiences: as a photographer's stylist, a seamstress and costumier, and a textile conservator at the Art Institute of Chicago. She also worked in the not-for-profit sector as a VISTA volunteer. Her leisure interests include gardening, hiking and outdoor activities, watching movies (documentary films are a special favorite), and reading nonfiction.

Alejandro Carrión

Phone: 847-491-8916
Office Location: 1908 Sheridan
E-mail: alejandro.carrion@northwestern.edu

Alejandro E. Carrión is a College Advisor and Assistant Professor of Teaching and Learning in Latina and Latino Studies. Alejandro is an educator, scholar and activist whose research is focused on the intersection of Latin@s and education. While at Northwestern he helped to co-found a youth participatory action research project (YPAR) which works with Chicago Public School (CPS) and New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) high school students to create meaningful and impactful community based research. Prior to Northwestern, he taught sociology and Latino Studies as an Adjunct Assistant Professor at several institutions including Brooklyn College, The City College of New York (CCNY), Manhattan College and Hostos Community College. Outside of the classroom, Alejandro has a rich background in piloting, directing and founding programs that assist students with their college transition in New York City. Such programs include, the CUNY Black Male Initiative at Hostos Community College, Let's Get Ready SAT prep program and The College Focus Program. Alejandro was born and raised in the South Bronx and received his Ph.D. in Urban Education from The Graduate Center at the City University of New York, an M.S. in Urban Affairs from Hunter College and a B.S. from Binghamton University in education and human development. 

Brady Clark

E-mail: bzack@northwestern.edu

Brady Clark is a Weinberg College Adviser and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Linguistics. He received a B.A. in linguistics from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. from the Department of Linguistics at Stanford University. Since joining the Northwestern University faculty in 2004, he has taught courses on syntax, meaning, historical linguistics, and the origin and evolution of language. His publications cover topics such as intonational meaning, the history of English syntax, the application of game theory to problems in several areas of linguistics, and theories of language evolution. His current research focus is the origin and evolution of syntax. He is also a certified nursing assistant for the state of Illinois.

Jaime Dominguez

E-mail: j-dominguez@northwestern.edu

Jaime Dominguez is College Adviser and Lecturer in the Department of Political Science. A native of California, he received his BA from the University of California at San Diego and his Ph.D. in Political Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago in 2007. His research interests include race and ethnicity, urban and Latino and minority politics. Professor Dominguez has taught at the University of Chicago, UIC, and DePaul University. In 2003 and 2004, he taught at Northwestern in the Department of Latino and Caribbean Studies. He is one of the principal architect’s of the Chicago Democracy Project (CDP), a thirty-year (1975-2005) online political database that provides citizens, community groups, and religious organizations with information on campaign finance, electoral outcomes, government contracts, minority appointments and levels of public employment for the City of Chicago. In addition, the CDP also provides links to demographic, economic, and other demographic information of interest to the public. Professor Dominguez is currently working on a second grant to expand the CDP to twenty five major cities as well as a pilot project that examines the state of Latino politics in Chicago. Of particular interest is how Latino heterogeneity and population growth is redefining traditional political and race relations between blacks and whites. He is author of “Illinois Latinos and the 2004 Elections: The Waiting Game Continues,” in de la Garza and DeSipio’s Latinos and the 2004 Elections (University of Notre Dame Press, 2007).

Sheila Donohue

E-mail: spdonohue@northwestern.edu

Sheila P. Donohue, Distinguished Senior Lecturer in English and College Adviser, joined the Northwestern University faculty in 1998. She received her MFA from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she was the Randall Jarrell Fellow and served as poetry editor and production manager for The Greensboro Review. She has worked in the educational publishing field, and before coming to Northwestern was a Wallace Stegner Writing Fellow and Jones Lecturer in Poetry at Stanford University. She is a recipient of an Academy of American Poets prize and several nominations for a Pushcart Prize, and her work has appeared in numerous national literary magazines, including Northwestern's own  TriQuarterly . She teaches poetry and fiction writing in the undergraduate English Major in Writing Program and in the MA and MFA programs in Creative Writing. She has been a faculty fellow in the Women's Residential College since 2003, and has traveled to 16 European Union countries, 3 former Eastern Bloc nations, 2 Asian countries, and Oaxaca, Mexico.

Myrna Garcia

Phone: 847-491-8916
Office Location: 1908 Sheridan
E-mail: myrna.garcia@northwestern.edu

Myrna García is a Weinberg College Advisor and an Assistant Professor of Instruction in the Latina and Latino Studies Program. She earned a M.A. in Education from Fordham University and a Ph.D. in Ethnic Studies from the University of California, San Diego. Her research documents Latina/o immigrant rights activism in Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood (1965-1986). Prior to her arrival at Northwestern, she taught at the University of Texas at Austin, Oberlin College, and Indiana University. She enjoys teaching courses on Latina/o/x im/migration, Chicana/Latina feminism, Latina/o/x History, and Latina/o/x Social Movements.​

Shelby Hatch

Phone: 847-491-8916
Office Location: 1908 Sheridan
E-mail: slhatch@northwestern.edu

Shelby is a Weinberg College Adviser and an Assistant Professor of Instruction in the Chemistry Department. She advises students from the second quarter of their first year until they graduate.  She has taught a variety of undergraduate chemistry courses - introductory lab classes, first year seminars, courses for non-scientists, and a capstone laboratory course for chemistry majors - plus firesides on the chemistry of beer & the chemistry of chocolate. Shelby's personal and professional interests intersect at the point where chemistry meets sustainability. She received her BA from The College of Wooster and her PhD from The University of Rochester.

Hilarie Lieb

E-mail: hilarie@northwestern.edu

Hilarie Lieb is a Weinberg College Adviser and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Economics. She received her PhD from the Department of Economics at Northwestern University in 2001. She received her BA fromFranklin and Marshall College with a focus on economics and mathematics. Her research integrates labor market theory with public policy to analyze outcomes that differ across race, gender and/or ethnicity. Her recent publications includes analysis of the historical impact of national policy on gender segregation in college majors and a historical analysis of the changing role of marriage, work, and children on women's poverty. Included in the courses she teaches are: Economics of Gender, special topics through freshman seminars and Labor Economics. Outside of the classroom she works closely with students on their own research projects. She is also a faculty adviser to the Northwestern Chapter of the National Student Partnership, a fellow to the Women's Residential College, and on NU's Sexual Assault Hearing/Appeals Board, the Truman Scholarship Board, and Chicago Field Studies Advisory Committee.  Other activities, not directly related to Northwestern include her role as a Board Member for campus Catalyst and a trustee for the Illinois Economic Association.

Michael Maltenfort

E-mail: malt@northwestern.edu

Michael Maltenfort is a Weinberg College Adviser and Lecturer in Mathematics. He earned his bachelor's degree in mathematics from Cornell University, and his doctorate, also in mathematics, from the University of Chicago.  Following graduation, he was a Peace Corps volunteer in Kenya.  He then returned to Chicago, where he briefly taught at DePaul University and Loyola University before joining the faculty at Truman College, where he taught from 2002 to 2013.  He loves the mathematical aspects of the Rubik’s Cube and related puzzles, and he also uses his mathematical talent when calling square dances:  he has been an enthusiastic square dancer for decades and has been a square dance caller since 2002.

Christine McCary

E-mail: christine.mccary@northwestern.edu

Christine McCary is a College Adviser and Lecturer in Biology. She received her BS from the University of Maryland at College Park, where she studied Cellular/Molecular Biology & Genetics. She earned her PhD in Immunology from Northwestern in 2011, focusing on the differential effects of vitamin E isoforms on activation of PKC-alpha and on a mouse model of allergic asthma. Before returning to Northwestern in 2013 as a College Adviser, she served as the Associate Director of Graduate Student Preparation in Career Advancement at the University of Chicago, specializing in the counseling and programmatic needs of graduate students in the biological and physical sciences. Christine's current academic interests focus on the intersection of nutrition and the immune response. Her favorite leisure activities include exercising, eating delicious Chicago food, and spending time with her partner, Dave, and their two cats, Alpha and Gus.

James O'Laughlin

E-mail: j-olaughlin@northwestern.edu

James O'Laughlin is a Distinguished Senior Lecturer in the Writing Program and a WCAS College Adviser. He received an A.B. in philosophy from Saint Louis University, and an M.A. in English from Northwestern University, and did additional graduate work in English at Northwestern. He received the Distinguished Teaching Award from Northwestern’s School of Professional Studies in 1999-2000, and in 2005 he was named to the ASG Faculty Honor Roll. He has taught a wide range of courses, including freshman seminars on Modern Irish Literature and American Indian Literature, Reading and Writing Fiction, Literary Editing, Reading and Writing Creative Nonfiction, Modes of Writing, and Intermediate Composition. He was a fiction editor at StoryQuarterly from 1998 until 2007 (and Co-Editor in 2004), has written many reviews of fiction, biography, and philosophy for Booklist, and is currently doing research on postcolonialism and Irish writing. He volunteers at A Just Harvest in Chicago.

Jeff Rice

E-mail: j-rice2@northwestern.edu

Jeff Rice is a Weinberg College Adviser and Senior Lecturer in History. He began his career at Northwestern in 1968 as an entering freshman and has been associated with the University in one way or another since then. After graduation he went on to begin graduate work at the University of Edinburgh, receiving a Masters Degree in African Studies after completing a dissertation entitled "Wealth Power and Corruption: A Study of Asante Political Culture." From there he returned to the History Department at Northwestern specializing in West African History. After a few years pursuing African History he left academia and became a full time bookseller at Great Expectations Bookstore (in Evanston) where he remained until its closure in 2001, eventually becoming its owner. During this time he continued to teach occasional courses at Northwestern in History as well as on the culture of publishing and bookselling.

He returned to Northwestern full time in 2001 teaching in the History Department and later becoming a Weinberg Adviser. His courses have included “West African History”, “Civil Wars in Africa”,  “Africa in Fact, Fiction and Film”, “Africa From Optimism to Pessimism” and a number of popular Freshman Seminars such as “From Nationalism to Ethnic Cleansing”.  He is a Fellow at Chapin Humanities Residential College and was one of the organizers of the Major in African Studies which debuted in 2010.  Jeff is also on the Executive Board of the Program of African Studies.

His current research interests involve the development of Afro-Pessimism and in particular, its pedagogical challenges.  In the spring of 2010 he hosted a conference on this topic at PAS.  The other focus of his interest involves conflicts in Africa and Central Asia and the reemergence of ideas of Indirect Rule which underlie some of the current approaches to counterinsurgency.

He lives with his wife Denise who is an artist and their six year old Basset Hound, Guiness and Cat named Stout.  He has four step-children (31,29,22,20) and if there is any spare time he is addicted to mystery novels, good music and films.

Andrew Rivers

E-mail: ajrivers@northwestern.edu

Andrew Rivers is a Weinberg College Adviser and a Lecturer in Physics and Astronomy. He received his B.S. in Physics from the University of Portland in 1993 and his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of New Mexico in 2000. Andrew's Ph.D. research included a large scale radio astronomy survey of the so-called "Zone of Avoidance": a large region of the sky containing few visible external galaxies due to obscuration by dust near the disk of our own Milky Way Galaxy. Looking for hidden galaxies using long wavelength radio waves which pass through the dust unobscured, Andrew discovered approximately 20 previously unknown nearby galaxies. Andrew joined the Northwestern University Physics department in 1999 and has since taught a variety of courses in physics and astronomy including the introductory physics sequence, Modern Cosmology and Ideas of Physics. In his free time, Andrew enjoys spending time with his wife Carolyn and his Pekinese puppy "Boo". Leisure activities include tinkering with Linux, attending obscure art films and reading nonfiction from diverse fields.

Deborah Rosenberg

Phone: 847-491-8916
Office Location:
 1908 Sheridan
E-mail: deborah-rosenberg@northwestern.edu

Deborah Rosenberg is a College Adviser and Assistant Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. She received her BA from Wesleyan University with majors in English and Spanish. Deborah earned her PhD in 2004 from the University of Chicago, where she wrote a dissertation on the role of the picaresque novel in Spanish national identity formation. She joined Northwestern in 2005 and has taught many courses in the department, including language courses at various levels and first-year seminars on Spanish and Latin American literature. In her free time, Deborah likes to travel and try out restaurants around Chicago with her family.

Fay Rosner

E-mail: f-rosner@northwestern.edu

Fay is a College Adviser and Lecturer in French, teaching second-year language courses, the French writing workshop, and a freshman seminar on Proust and the arts. She also serves as a Faculty Fellow in the College of Community and Cultural Studies. Before completing her PhD in French at the University of Chicago, she directed the Office of Career Services at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Fay holds a B.A. in French and B.S. in psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana. She enjoys going to chamber music concerts at Northwestern and singing in the Northwestern Music Academy chorus.

Bill Savage

E-mail: b-savage@northwestern.edu

Besides his work as a College Adviser, Bill Savage is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English. He co-edited Nelson Algren's The Man with the Golden Arm, 50th Anniversary Critical Edition (with Daniel Simon, Seven Stories Press, 1999) as well as Algren's Chicago City on the Make, 50th Anniversary Edition, Newly Annotated (with David Schmittgens, University ofChicago Press, 2001). Savage wrote his doctoral dissertation at Northwestern on the influence of material culture on the reading of narrative, the formation of canons, and the expression of literary values, using Algren's career and reception as his test case. He has written or edited entries on the Beat Generation, Journalism, Fiction, and Poetry for the Encyclopedia of Chicago, as well as the entry for Algren in the New Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature. His scholarly and teaching interests range across twentieth-century American literature, from Chicago writers to the Lost and Beat generations, graphic novels, and popular culture, especially baseball, sequential art, and animation.  His most recent publications include "'It Was Dope!': The Paperback Revolution and the Literary Reputation of Nelson Algren" (in Nelson Algren: A Collection of Critical Essays, Robert Ward, ed. FDUP, 2007) and "L'amoureuse et l'Autre," an essay about Simone de Beauvoir's letters to Algren in the French journal Le Magazine Litteraire (No. 471, January 2008).  He won the Distinguished Teaching Award from Northwestern's School for Continuing Studies in 2004, and has been named to the Associated Student Government Faculty Honor Roll three times.  He also works as a Series Editor for Chicago: Visions + Revisions, a series of new non-fiction books about Chicago from the University of Chicago Press.  He is a lifelong resident of Chicago's Rogers Park neighborhood.

Elizabeth Smith

E-mail: eliz.smith@northwestern.edu

Elizabeth Smith is a College Adviser and Lecturer in the Anthropology Department. She graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1991 with a double major in Anthropology and Comparative Literature and a certificate in African Studies.  While working at the American University in Cairo for three years in university administration, she began her MA in Anthropology then went on to receive her MA (1999) and PhD (2006) in Sociocultural Anthropology from New York University. Prior to coming to Northwestern, she was an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Vermont and a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of California-Berkeley.  She has taught courses on gender in the Middle East, tourism and museums, and the history of anthropology.  Professor Smith is finishing her first book, Nubian Nostalgia, about the roles of race, ethnicity, and gender in nostalgia about Nubians in Egyptian popular culture such as media, tourism, and museums.  Her other publications on this research address material culture and nationalism in the Nubia Museum of Aswan, race and media images of Nubians, identification with archaeological sites in nostalgia for Nubia, and how photographs of Nubia circulate in popular culture.  Her more recent research is on the use of induced lactation in orphan fostering among Muslim Egyptians.  The study examines how in the face of religious texts and social stigma prohibiting adoption, infertile couples turn to induced lactation to create “milk kinship” through breastmilk in order to raise orphaned and abandoned children in their families.  Professor Smith and her husband and two children live in West Rogers Park with Bella the yellow lab mix. They frequently enjoy the restaurants on Devon, and Bella enjoys Warren Park.

Glenn Sucich

E-mail: g-sucich@northwestern.edu

Glenn Sucich is a Weinberg College Adviser and Lecturer in English.  He earned his B.A. in History from the University of California, Berkeley, and his Ph.D. in English from Northwestern University.  Since joining the faculty of Northwestern's English Department in 2005, he has taught classes on Milton, Shakespearean tragedy, the history of hell, the genre of epic, and the relationship among magic, science, and religion during the Early Modern period in Europe.  In 2009, he received the WCAS Arts and Sciences Alumni Teaching Award and has twice been selected to the Associated Student Government Faculty Honor Roll.  His research focuses on the intersection of Early Modern religion and natural philosophy, particularly in the work of John Milton and his contemporaries.  He has published articles on Milton, the poet Samuel Butler, and the Early Modern physician and natural philosopher William Harvey.  When he's not working with students at Northwestern, he enjoys spending time with his wife and three sons in and around their home in Chicago.

Liz Fekete Trubey

E-mail: eft@northwestern.edu

Liz Fekete Trubey is Director of Academic Advising in Weinberg (2013-2016) and Distinguished Senior Lecturer in English. She received her BA from the University of Pennsylvania, where she studied English and History. She earned her Ph.D. in English from Northwestern in 2001, specializing in nineteenth-century American women’s writing. She teaches a wide variety of courses about topics such as higher education, early American novels, nineteenth-century American literature, sentimentalism, gender, American women’s fiction, literary theory, and Holocaust writings. She has written articles and presented talks about women as sentimental readers in and of nineteenth century fiction, representations of slavery and women’s authorship in the South, and the fascinating awfulness of the film "The Scarlet Letter." Her work has been published in American LiteratureModern Language Studies, and Reading Women: Literary Figures and Cultural Icons from the Victorian Age to the Present (Janet Badia and Jennifer Phegley, eds., University of Toronto Press, 2005). Liz spends her free time with her husband, Todd, and her daughter, Megan, often watching college sports.

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