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Northwestern University

Choosing a First-Year Seminar

Fall Quarter 2017 First-Year Seminars

The following seminars will be offered in Fall 2017.  Click on the ">" in front of a title to read the course description. When you have identified the ten seminars that interest you most, log in to your dossier and scroll down to First-Year Seminar Selections: Fall 2017. The Top 10 selection process will close Monday, July 31st at 11:59pm. You will be placed in your Fall 2017 seminar at the beginning of August.

TitleDayTime

Instructor(s): Martha Wilfahrt
Political Science

Description:

This course introduces students to modern sub-Saharan African politics through literature and film. Students will examine political commentary and allegories embedded within African novels and films, analyzing how these works view the exercise of power in African societies. Coursework addresses set of key themes, beginning with the political upheaval of colonialism and continuing through to the present by covering questions of postcolonial state-building, corruption and neopatriomonialism, the effects of state collapse and civil war and the politics of development. Legacies of the precolonial and colonial era and the impact of international actors will be discussed throughout. We will read and watch material from across the region, thinking comparatively about political experiences and trajectories.

African Politics through Literature and Film
MW11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Will Reno
Political Science

Description:

This course surveys the changing American strategies in the conduct of warfare since the end of the Cold War in 1989. The course opens with a consideration of the massive military buildup and assault on Iraq in 1991. The American military presence in that region never went away. This presence provides us with a framework for analyzing the changing character of warfare. Consideration of the Iraq War (2003-2011) focuses on the development of counterinsurgency and the emergence of multi-domain warfare (i.e., political warfare, information warfare, etc.) and increased reliance on low-profile Special Operations Forces. Our attention then turns to recent challenges of hybrid warfare (i.e., hacking and fake news and their roles in conflicts), and the advent of flexible responses such as increased American reliance on drones and contractors in the conduct of warfare. The course ends with the consideration of several emerging American war-fighting strategies.

The American Way of War
TTH11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Laura Panko
Biological Sciences

Description:

Anatomy is often thought of as simply a series of facts and spatial relationships that must be memorized. In fact, the structure of living things can only be fully understood and appreciated in the context of history (evolution), growth and development (ontogeny), and operation (function). This seminar will explore topics in the evolution, ontogeny, and function of organisms with backbones (vertebrates) that inform the scientific understanding of the human form. In the process of exploring these topics, the main learning goal of the course will be addressed: to practice the variety of writing skills needed by students to successfully communicate science ideas in college courses and beyond.

Anatomy: Evolution, Ontogeny & Function
MWF9:00-9:50am

Instructor(s): Taco Terpstra
Classics

Description:

It is tempting to assume that in many ways the Romans were "just like us." TV shows and movies habitually promote this view, projecting a picture of the Romans through a conspicuously modern lens. This course highlights what was different about Roman society in order to provide a historical perspective and to provide a mirror for our modern society. It is perhaps not surprising that our own time--obsessed as it is with GDP growth, the ups and downs of the stock market, inflation rates, the state deficit--produces scholarship that studies the ancient Roman economy. This scholarship has made us increasingly aware of how different Rome was from the modern world. Our industrialized, highly technological, post-demographic transition society is a relatively new phenomenon that has been developing only over the past two centuries. This course will focus on what that difference means for the realities of everyday life, both past and present. Questions to be addressed are: What exactly did economic growth mean for the economy of the Romans? Can we even measure it? What was the role of resource depletion? What was the role of social class in business? What was the influence on the economy of a demographic regime where average life expectancy at birth was perhaps 25 years? How was trade conducted over large distances without fast means of communication and transport? What was the role of technology and technological progress in the economy?

Ancient Roman Economy
MW3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Henry Binford
History

Description:

This course is in part about poverty, but it is even more about the ways Americans have thought about poverty and tried to combat it.  We will explore two periods of U.S. history: 1890-1910 and 1960-1990.  In each period we will examine the forces that impoverished individuals and families, the issues raised in explanations of poverty, the range of remedies proposed, and the ways they were justified.  In both periods we will try to determine how Americans answered some lasting questions:  How is poverty defined?  Who among the poor deserves what kind of help?  Does helping the poor promote dependence?  What are the implications of poverty for the health of the nation as a whole? The primary purpose of the course is to give students experience in some of the techniques employed by historians: close and critical reading of documents; reconstruction of the thinking of past actors and evaluation of their assumptions, motives, and options; and the production of clear, fair, and inclusive analyses of what happened.  While the subject matter of the course has obvious relevance to present-day concerns, our primary goal is to think (and write) about the past.

Anti-Poverty Crusades
MW3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Carl Petry
History

Description:

The Arabian Nights are the most popular example of Arabic literature in the western world. They inspired playwrights during the heyday of print culture, and filmmakers as recently as Walt Disney's Aladdin. From the historian's perspective, they are a collection of stories compiled during the Middle Ages in such cities as Baghdad, Cairo and Damascus. They reflect traditions that are much older, and draw upon legends widely repeated in such diverse regions as China, India, Iran and Turkey. Analysts of pre-modern societies in the Islamic world now recognize The Arabian Nights as a major literary source that sheds light on many types of colorful people whose antics enlivened the scene in great Islamic cities of pre-modern times, but who remain largely invisible in more formal sources. The Nights also raise issues of cultural practice that contrast with formal strictures imposed by such sacred texts as the Koran itself. The fact that the stories were allegedly told by a woman conniving to stave off vengeance killings by a ruler raises intriguing questions about male-female relations. We will consider these issues in the context of various translations that themselves reveal biases of modern-day writers, who may have reveled in the worlds of counter-culture or pornography.

The Arabian Nights: Counter-Culture or Pornography?
MW3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Claudia Swan
Art History

Description:

This seminar offers an introduction to principal architectural and art historical monuments that make up the cultural landscape of Chicago. Like any major city, Chicago has come to be associated with and by its well-known and revered works of art and architecture. Grant Wood’s American Gothic, Monet’s Haystacks, and Gustave Caillebotte’s Paris Street; Rainy Day are just some of the most famous paintings whose renown is linked with that of the city itself. Anish Kapoor’s 2006 Cloud Gate (also known as The Bean) is a massive public sculpture that reflects the forms of its visitors and viewers as well as the skyline of downtown Chicago: it is exemplary of how interconnected the art and architecture and identity of the city are. By way of individual research work and frequent site visits, students will develop an understanding of major architectural interventions around the turn of the 20th century and the rise of early skyscrapers; the impact of Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright; the high modernism of Mies van der Rohe; and signature contemporary buildings by Rem Koolhaas and Renzo Piano, among others. We will also study the canonical artworks that form the core of the Art Institute of Chicago’s collection (Impression, in particular) as well as works of contemporary art at the Museum of Contemporary Art and in other exhibition spaces as well. Our emphasis will be on making sense of the ways in which the art and architecture of Chicago can be understand as organs in a living, developing city.

Art & Architecture in Chicago
MW3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Stephen Reinke
Art Theory & Practice

Description:

We'll look at both historical and contemporary uses of audio in a wide-variety of contexts including installation, performance (as performance art intersects with both theatrical and musical performances), experimental composition techniques, radio and internet broadcast, recordings, etc. We're likely to encounter the Italian Futurist, the Zurich Dadaists, Satie, Artaud, Beckett, Stockhausen, Cage, musique concrete, Maryanne Amacher, Steve Reich, Alvin Lucier, Robert Morris, Sun Ra, Janet Cardiff, William Basinski, Susan Philipsz, James Richards, and many more.

Audio Art: Experiments in Sound
MW11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Anupam Garg
Physics & Astronomy

Description:

Along with Nano, Bio, and Enviro, Info is the fourth big `O' influencing science and society today. Classical information theory dates to before 1950, with the seminal work of Claude Shannon, Alan Turning, and others. The last two to three decades have seen the growth of a new understanding of information as a physical entity subject to the laws of quantum mechanics, and the possibility of exploiting this understanding for technological advances. This seminar will address quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum information processing more generally, along with what this pragmatic attitude might tell us about the deep philosophical puzzles of the quantum mechanical implications for the nature of reality.

The Brave New World of Quantum Information
TTH2:00-3:20pm

Instructor(s): Marcia Grabowecky
Psychology

Description:

In this seminar we will examine the nature of the mind from both Buddhist and traditional Western psychological perspectives. We will employ Buddhist techniques for investigating mental activity by incorporating a brief meditation period into class and homework activities. We will also examine written materials from both traditions, and these will form the primary basis for class discussion and written assignments.

Buddhist Psychology
MW3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Owen Priest
Chemistry

Description:

In The Chemistry of Food we will explore the chemistry and science of nutrition, cooking, food preservation, flavoring, coloring, and aroma. We will explore the science of salt, sugar & high fructose corn syrup, leavening agents, microwaves, proteins, and fats. What is the science behind genetically modified foods and why is it so controversial? What is celiac disease and gluten sensitivity? Is gluten sensitivity real? What does the science say? These questions, and more, will be explored through readings that will include the textbooks listed below. Grades will be based on class participation and short writing assignments, four papers based on the readings, and a final term paper.

The Chemistry of Food
MWF 11:00-11:50am

Instructor(s): Paul Goerss
Mathematics

Description:

In 1933, under great internal and external stress, the democratic Weimar Republic of Germany collapsed, ceding power and control to the Nazi Party. There followed a humanitarian tragedy of incomprehensible scope that leveled Europe and drew in the entire world. History is never inevitable, and this was the result of decisions, choices, and attitudes of specific people in a specific era. We will examine what happened, how it happened, German culture of the time, the choices the leaders made, and the choices the ordinary people faced. We will read history to get a picture of events, but we will also read reprints of contemporary documents, and narratives written by people of the period. Germany was a highly developed and highly educated nation, an economic powerhouse with a long history of scientific, intellectual, cultural, and human achievement. It was also a nation in transition, faced with a unique set of social and economic pressures. The aim is to develop a case study in how this nation could step into the abyss of murderous totalitarianism.

The Coming of the Third Reich
TTH3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Kathleen Carmichael
Writing Program

Description:

What makes a writer credible?  In other words, how do readers determine what writers deserve their trust?  Every day we place our confidence in strangers who advise us on matters that range from the immediate (movies and restaurants) to the long-term (our money and our health).  Yet high-profile scandals—such as fraudulent reporting at the New York Times—remind us that we must not place our faith too casually.  In this course, we will examine the relationship between writers and their readers with an eye to understanding how the style, social context, and unspoken assumptions of a written work help inspire our confidence or elicit our disbelief in both the context of fiction and non-fiction.  Students will be asked to consider the ethical responsibilities both of readers, alert to the possibility of misrepresentation or fraud, and of writers seeking to establish their own credibility and authority. Course readings will include works of fiction, journalism, and writings from the natural and social sciences.  We will also consider practical topics such as how University library resources and experts can help students locate and evaluate key sources and develop authoritative arguments.

The Credible Writer
TTH2:00-3:20pm

Instructor(s): Donna Jurdy
Earth & Planetary Sciences

Description:

The death of the dinosaurs as well as theories and evidence for other catastrophic extinctions will be examined. Geologic time and the history of life on earth, plate tectonics, dinosaur classification and behavior, periodicities, cosmic occurrences, and the search for Nemesis, the "Death Star" will be included in the seminar.

Death of the Dinosaurs
MW2:00-3:20pm

Instructor(s): Paola Zamperini
Asian Languages & Cultures

Description:

The course will explore the world of dreams in pre-modern, modern, and, if time allows it, contemporary Chinese literature and culture. Beginning with Daoist and Buddhist sources, and proceeding in a chronological fashion, we will navigate the dreamscapes mapped by traditional oneiromancy, philosophy, poetry, drama, fiction, all the way to contemporary theatrical and cinematic discourse. What do dreams mean? How does their language intersect with the language of faith, desire, gender, politics, power and fear? How similar and how different are our dreaming brains today from those of Chinese philosophers that lived three thousand years ago? Do cultural differences make us dream different dreams? These are just some of the questions that we will try to answer together during the course of the quarter. In order to do so, we will look at the semantic, religious and aesthetic function of dreams in the changing world of Chinese culture, connecting our findings to recent discoveries in the fields of contemporary psychology, psychoanalysis and neuroscience. Where possible, we will also engage in comparison with dream-related practices and traditions in other Asian contexts, such as those of India and Tibet. 

Dreamlands: The Universe of Dreams in Chinese Literature
TTH2:00-3:20pm

Instructor(s): Benjamin Gorvine
Political Science

Description:

While those going in to the field of mental health typically think about it as a "helping profession", there is much more than meets the eye when it comes to the economics and politics that have defined the development of the field. The purpose of this course is to explore some of the historical and economic forces that have shaped the field as it exists today. The course will begin with an exploration of the role of state mental hospitals in the U.S. in the early to mid-20th century, and examine the political forces that drove the de-institutionalization movement of the 1970s and 1980s. The course will also focus on the evolution of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (now in its 5th edition), and some of the problems that have emerged from the disease-based framework utilized in the manual. The aggressive way in which the DSM has been marketed internationally will be discussed. Finally, the course will explore critiques of the pharmaceutical industry and modern psychiatry. Some of these themes will also be explored through analysis of popular films and other media.

The Economics and Politics of Mental Health Diagnosis & Treatment
MW10:00-10:50am

Instructor(s): Jeanne Herrick
Writing Program

Description:

This is a course for people who love food: eating it, cooking it, growing it, and going to restaurants.   We will explore the connection between food and love, food and culture, food and religion, and food and family. We will also explore how the commercialization of food and agribusiness has changed what and how we eat. We’ll watch some famous movies on food: The Big Night, Jiro loves Sushi, and the important documentary, Food, Inc. Students will be encouraged to follow a food interest of their own as a topic for the writing assignments. We will also look at the two latest trends in food: molecular chemistry and foraging.

The Edible Word: Reading & Writing about Food
TTH9:30-10:50am

Instructor(s): Scott Ogawa
Economics

Description:

The goal of this course will be to learn the basic tools of game theory and use them to explore various topics including sports, politics, and evolutionary biology. During class students will occasionally participate in "economic experiments" where they will interact strategically with each other to see how well theory matches actual outcomes. We will discuss what such experiments reveal about economic models of decision-making and strategic interaction.

Experimenting in the Social Sciences
MW9:30-10:50am

Instructor(s): Mark Hauser
Anthropology

Description:

Did astronauts from another planet establish ancient civilizations on Earth? Were the Americas discovered by Columbus, a Ming dynasty fleet or by Vikings much earlier? Did the Maya Aztec build their pyramids to resemble those of dynastic Egypt? Television is replete with stories of ancient aliens and archaeological mysteries. The impact of such alternative realities on society and history cannot be discounted. They have been used to support nationalistic agendas, racial biases, and religious movements, all of which can have considerable influence on contemporary society. In this course, we will study "fantastic" stories, puzzles, hoaxes, imaginative worlds and alternative theories. We will learn when, how and what kinds of evidence these alternative theories have used to fascinate the public and illustrate their hoaxes. We will question such theories by using critical thinking and analytical tools to diagnose what is fact and fiction. We will utilize the surviving evidence that archaeologists find to understand cultural contact and interactions.

Fantastic Archaeology: Science & Pseudoscience
MW11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Jane Winston
French & Italian

Description:

Rising seas, extreme temperature variations, and life-threatening storms: these are among the building blocks of Climate Fiction (Cli-Fi), a new literary genre that takes up the challenge of climate change in the Anthropene, the proposed epoch in which human beings significantly impact the geological and ecological systems of the planet, to imagine the future to which climate change might give rise and the human beings who will confront it. Climate change novels ask: how might climate change transform the world in which we live? What will the world be like in the future, and what will it mean to the human beings who live in it? The alternative visions of the future elaborated in the works of climate change fiction often combine characteristics of science fiction with elements of other genres, including the romance, the thriller, and the adventure tale. In addition to inquiring into the literary issue of how and with what literary means these novels manage to imagine the future, we will seek to understand: if and how literature manages to imagine a process as widely taken to be “unimaginable” as is climate change, whether fiction might further human knowledge or awareness or if it might modify human actions in the world. We will engage in close and detailed reading and discussion of some of the most compelling contemporary Cli-Fi novels and in writing about them critically. This seminar requires active and engaged student participation.

The Fiction of Climate Change
TTH2:00-3:20pm

Instructor(s): Mary Finn
English

Description:

Mary Shelley wrote her story, intended to win a whose-story-is-scariest contest, during the summer of 1816 in Geneva, Switzerland.   The weather was record breaking in its inclemency, a direct result of a catastrophic volcano explosion in far-away Tunisia a full year earlier.  “The famous novel is actually a tale of climate change,” claims one critic.  In fact Frankenstein the novel is not horror-movie frightening; instead it frightens with its view of nature, including weather, the elements, landscapes, and of course, human life.  In this course first we will read Frankenstein slowly and closely.  Then we will read AFTER Frankenstein, including Phillip Pullman’s stage adaptation and other appropriations.  We will study the history of illustrations of Dr. Frankenstein’s creation, as well as the history of interpretations of that creation’s humanity or lack thereof.  In Frankenstein, what does “life” mean?  That’s what we will explore

Frankenstein and the Meaning of Life
TTH9:30-10:50am

Instructor(s): Elisabeth Elliott
Slavic Languages and Literatures

Description:

In this course we will explore some of the sociolinguistic issues (that is connections between language and society) in various Slavic speaking countries and areas (the Russian Federation, the former Soviet Union, the former Czechoslovakia, etc.) and in Central Europe (specifically, Turkish in Germany). We will also look at contemporary issues in Russia and the Ukraine as these relate to sociolinguistic issues, particularly the annexation of the Crimea, anti-gay laws in Russia, and censorship of Pussy Riot. Issues to be examined include: language policies, minority language rights, language vs. dialect, language planning, language and identity, and language and nationalism. As the final paper for this course, students will work on any geopolitical area in the world and examine the sociolinguistic issues particular to that region or linguistic variety. Some previous papers, for example, have looked at the role of Japanese in Korea; Koreans in Japan and language discrimination issues; the languages of South Africa; the status of African-American English (or African-American Vernacular English, or Black English) in the US and the controversy surrounding it in the 1990s in the Oakland, CA school district; US language change and the Internet and social media; Celtic in Ireland; the successful revival of a dead language, e.g., Hebrew, as the official language of Israel; language rights in the EU; American Indian languages; bilingualism in the US or Canada; Kurdish language discrimination in Turkey; and others.

From Facism to Pussy Riot
MW9:30-10:50am

Instructor(s): Ann Orloff
Sociology

Description:

In this class, we will investigate how gender – as a set of relations, identities and cultural schemas -- shapes politics, including political participation and representation, the formation of social movements (e.g., the feminist and anti-ERA movements), and social policy, as well as how, in turn, political institutions and policy shape gender. We aim to understand gendered politics and policy from both "top down" and "bottom up" perspectives.

Gender, Politics, and Society
TTH3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Kim Suiseeya
Political Science

Description:

Environmental problems like deforestation, biodiversity loss, climate change, and ocean and marine resource degradation have emerged as some of the most intractable problems that society faces. They transcend international borders, are scientifically complex, and generally involve large sets of diverse actors and power dynamics from global to local scales. In this first year seminar we will examine how policies, actions, and behaviors impact the environment and how these politics of the environment play out on a global scale. This collaborative seminar will introduce students to the diverse ways in which different social science disciplines, epistemologies, and methodologies shape the ways in which we understand global environmental problems and solutions. While our primary assigned reading materials approach the topics through a political science lens, through individual research assignments and integrated peer assessments, students will be exposed to variety of approaches that will help us think about other ways of understanding a problem. By the end of the course, students will have a broad understanding of the nature of global environmental politics as well as specific knowledge related to a topic of their choosing.

Global Environmental Politics
MW2:00-3:20pm

Instructor(s): Shauna Seliy
English

Description:

In 2010, a string of suicides by gay teens brought attention to just how tough growing up gay can be. In response, the It Gets Better Project was developed by Dan Savage as a place where people who had learned that things do get better could tell their stories through short videos. Some writers and filmmakers have been turning out their own It Gets Better projects in movies and novels and essays for many years. Way back in 1952, for example, Patricia Highsmith, in her novel, The Price of Salt, intentionally gave her gay characters a happy ending. In this course, we’ll explore the (positive and negative) ways that authors and filmmakers have represented the experience of what it’s like to grow up gay. We’ll examine the ways in which the portrayal of young gay characters has evolved in literature and film, paying particular attention to stories that allow the characters to be portrayed fully and that allow room for a happy ending. 

Growing up Gay
TTH11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Barbara Shwom
Writing Program

Description:

Every day on television and radio, on the streets and in classrooms, we hear people expressing opinions about a variety of topics. The people who are most persuasive, however, are those who are most informed. This course is designed to give students the tools to develop an informed opinion, to present that opinion to others orally and in writing, and to persuade others to consider (and even accept) their point of view. In this seminar, you will have the opportunity to select a topic of your choice and research it in depth, using library resources, the Internet, interviews and surveys. You will also learn a number of techniques for presenting your ideas persuasively, both orally and in writing. By the end of the course, you will be in position to discuss your ideas in a thoughtful, authoritative way. In this sense, you will have earned the right to call yourself an expert on your topic.

How to become an Expert in Roughly Ten Weeks
MWF11:00-11:50am

Instructor(s): Charles Yarnoff
Writing Program

Description:

In 2014, President Obama said, “We are and always will be a nation of immigrants." What can we learn about the implications of that historical fact by reading stories written by and about immigrants to this country? The goal of this seminar is to answer that question as well as these others: How do immigrant experiences differ based on the era and country of origin, and in what ways are they similar?  What happens to the relationships between parents and children through the process of acculturation into American society?  How do social institutions and structures impact the lives of immigrants as they seek to pursue the American Dream? How do differences in national origin connect with other differences, particularly gender, race, ethnicity, and class? We will read novels, memoirs, and poetry that range from the beginning to the end of the 20th century and that tell stories of immigrants from Barbados, China, Mexico, Russia, and elsewhere.

Immigrant Stories
MWF1:00-1:50pm

Instructor(s): Brannon Ingram
Religious Studies

Description:

This course examines the history, politics, culture and economy of how Islam and Muslims have been represented in the north Atlantic world (the ‘West’). It begins with a brief overview of Western representations of Muslims during the early modern period, then explores how colonialism shaped the modern history and politics of contemporary Islamophobia. The bulk of the course will focus in depth on the politics, culture and economy of Islamophobia in the United States, aiming to empower students to understand and navigate the contemporary context. The course gives particular attention to ways that Muslims have sought to challenge, complicate and subvert how they are represented. Assignments will include site visits in Chicagoland, and individual or group projects that draw on ethnography and/or oral history. Counts toward Religion, Law and Politics religious studies major concentration.

Islamophobia
TTH9:30-10:50am

Instructor(s): Robert Gundlach
Linguistics

Description:

How do children achieve the remarkable feat of acquiring language? Which aspects of the human capacity for language are best understood as biological, as species-wide and species-specific? How do families, schools, and communities help shape children’s development as speakers and listeners, and eventually their development as readers and writers? How does learning a first language (or more than one language) interact with learning to think, learning to imagine, and developing a sense of identity? How is early language experience related to opportunities later in life? We will begin exploring these questions by reading I Can Hear You Whisper: An Intimate Journey through the Science of Sound and Language by Lydia Denworth and Why We Cooperate by Michael Tomasello. We will also sample firsthand the topics, methods, and forms of argument characteristic of current scientific research, We will then extend our exploration by considering how children learn to read and write and by reflecting on the role of language in children’s development of cultural and individual identity.

Language & Childhood
TTH9:30-10:50am

Instructor(s): Myrna Garcia
Latina/o Studies

Description:

The course will explore the diverse histories, identities, and experiences of Chicago’s heterogeneous Latina/o/x populations through an interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary framework. We will examine the formation and transformation of various Mexican, Puerto Rican, and other Latina/o communities in Chicago. We will investigate how Latinas/os/xs define and understand their respective histories, communities, resilience, and struggles. We will also interrogate the creation and engagement with Latinidades, an identification as a pan-Latina/o/x group. To that end, we will explore inter- and intra-Latina/o/x cultural expressions, relationships, and collaborations. Lastly, we will discuss how the scholarship on Latinas/os/xs in Chicago has shaped the field of Latina/o Studies

Latina/o/x Chicago
MW2:00-3:20pm

Instructor(s): Erin Waxenbaum
Anthropology

Description:

We recently celebrated the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth. But what would he think of our world today? We have a sophisticated understanding of genes and the ability to trace our ancestry over generations. Yet despite this knowledge, conclusive and irrefutable proof that we have or are continuing to evolve has not been found. In this course we will address where we might have come from and where we might be going. We will cover some of the major "issues" in biological evolution ranging from those of originating in Darwin's time to the many questions that persist today.

Making of the Fittest: Issues in Evolution
MW11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Christine Russin
Biological Sciences

Description:

Medicinal plants have a rich history - over 80% of the world\'s population uses medicines derived from plants for at least part of their healthcare. In this course we will explore Western medicines containing or derived from plant products as well as traditional non-Western (mainly Ayurvedic and Traditional Chinese Medicine) herbal remedies and supplements. For each plant we will examine the function of the active compound(s) in the plant, then the mode of action and efficacy in humans. Lecture and discussion topics will come from a variety of sources, but most commonly from primary literature.

Medical Marajuana
MW3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Dyan Elliott
History

Description:

What did medieval women think about? What were their hopes and dreams? How close did they come to realizing their dreams and what forces stood in their way? This course will attempt to answer these questions by examining the work of female authors hailing from different classes, in different centuries writing in different genres, and placing each in her historical context.  Learn how the martyr Perpetua defied family and society to embrace Christianity; how the nun-playwright, Hrosvith, bent the Roman classics to make virgins into heroes; how the writer Marie de France created the forbear of Harlequin romance; how the aristocratic Christine de Pizan defended women from male slander; and how Margery Kempe, a mystic wanna-be, found God and eluded her husband! 

Medieval Women
TTH3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): David Smith
Psychology

Description:

For many, music serves a valuable function in everyday life. Music can serve as a mode of artistic expression, a method of relaxation, a means of influencing mood, and an avenue toward transcendence. This course will focus on the human experience of music by integrating research and theory from cognitive, social, and developmental psychology. Special attention will be given to topics such as the perception of music, the development of musical expertise and creativity, the effect of music on cognition, the emotional impact of music, and effective musical instruction.

Music and the Mind
TH9:30-10:50am

Instructor(s): Mark McLish
Religious Studies

Description:

In developing Middle-earth, Tolkien intentionally sought to create a mythology. In this course, we will read The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings as mythology. We will analyze theories of myth, examine how Tolkien's scholarship and understanding of mythology shaped his tales, and explore the mythic themes in these works. We will also consider the enduring appeal of these stories as modern myth.   

Myth and Legend in Tolkien
MW9:30-10:50am

Instructor(s): Liz Trubey
English

Description:

Why go to college? To become educated? To stay up all night thinking deep thoughts? To prepare for a career? To party? Is college a straight and narrow path through requirements and electives to graduation, or is the story more complicated, more open-ended? What happens when the story ends (or doesn’t end) at graduation? Does attending college even matter today? The stories we tell about the college experience shape our expectations and our experiences at a university – as do current debates about the value of a liberal arts education. 

Narratives of College
MWF9:00-9:50am

Instructor(s): Juan Martinez
English

Description:

Someone wrote a whole book on Celine Dion’s “My Heart Will Go On.” We’ll read it. We’ll also read a series of essays on Internet cats, all to investigate how our obsessions intersect with issues of taste (what we think of as “good” or “bad”). People can be obsessed with websites (like Facebook), celebrities, TV shows, hobbies, foods, pets, a boyfriend or girlfriend, a place—any number of things. In this seminar, we’ll look at the ways in which individual obsessions sometimes intersect with broader social or cultural concerns, and we’ll read excerpts from the writings of notorious and talented obsessives. We’ll also examine what obsessions can (or maybe cannot) tell us about other people and about ourselves: who we are, what we want, what we’re afraid of, what we’re drawn to, where we’ve been, where we’re going. 

Obsessed: Taste Pop Culture
MW11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Sarah Maza
History

Description:

What does it mean to “collaborate with” or “resist” a heinous regime?  How do nations choose to remember or try to forget shameful episodes of their past?  These questions frame one of the most notorious episodes in modern European history, the occupation of France by Germany during World War II and the role of the collaborationist French government in sending over 70 000 Jews to their deaths in the camps.  This  course will explore, in a first section, the experiences  and choices of French women and men under German occupation based on memoirs, documentaries, and historical accounts.  In the second part we will look at how French governments and people have dealt with the memory of France’s “Dark Years,” including attempts to erase, commemorate, and dramatize this period through government policies, monuments, movies and hit French television series.

Occupied France 1940-1945
TTH3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Amy Partridge
Gender & Sexuality Studies

Description:

The U.S. 1970s Women’s Health Movement demanded everything from safe birth control on demand to an end to for-profit healthcare. Some participants formed research collectives and published D-I-Y guides to medical knowledge such as the Boston Women's Health Collective's Women and Their Bodies or Carol Downer's A New View of a Woman's Body. Some movement members established battered women's shelters, underground abortion referral services, and feminist health clinics. Others formed local committees and national networks, such as the Committee for Abortion Rights and Against Sterilization Abuse (CARASA) and the National Women's Health Network (NWHN), with the goal of transforming contemporary medical protocols and scientific research agendas. Because many of these local and national groups are still in existence, original movement goals continue to define the parameters of a "women's health" agenda in the present moment. On the other hand, the Women's Health Movement was (and is) a heterogeneous movement. Then, as now, groups with competing ideas about the healthcare needs of women as a group identified as part of same movement. Thus, an examination of historical and current debates over "women's health" is also a means of assessing several distinct, often competing, paradigms of health and disease. Moreover, how we articulate a "women's health agenda" depends on our (often taken-for-granted) ideas about gender, sexuality, and embodiment itself.

Our Bodies Ourselves: The Women’s Health Movement
TTH11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Michael Smutko
Physics & Astronomy

Description:

Human perception and understanding of the universe has changed dramatically over the centuries.  Astronomers used to believe that objects in the Heavens were attached to great crystalline spheres that moved about the Earth with accompanying music.  Today, astronomers believe that the Heavens are dominated by a mysterious “dark energy” force that may ultimately tear the universe apart.  On top of that, some physicists think that everything from electrons to gravity itself is made of vibrating loops of string-like energy moving through 11-dimensional space.  Which is stranger?  You decide.  We will discuss (in a non-mathematical fashion) how our view of the cosmos has evolved thanks to the work of Galileo, Hubble, Einstein, Schrödinger and many others.  We will explore not just their ideas, but also the intellectual struggles and the drama behind those ideas. 

Perceptions of the Universe
TTH9:30-10:50am

Instructor(s): Averill Curdy
English

Description:

In this seminar we will explore the idea of the City as an imaginative and imaginary space, where constant change defeats nostalgia, where the spectacle of street-life not only entertains, but also enlightens, and where variety invites experiment. While considering questions of performance, authenticity, and identity, we will also investigate the concept of the flâneur, or connoisseur of the street, and students will be asked to undertake urban explorations of their own. In addition to reading work by a number of poets and other writers, including Virginia Woolf, Patti Smith, Frank O’Hara, and Gwendolyn Brooks, we will also look at collaborations between writers, artists, and musicians. 

Pickpockets, Poets, and Other Sad Marvels of City Life
MW3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Kyla Ebbels Duggan
Philosophy

Description:

In the Republic, Plato argues that democracies have a natural tendency to devolve into tyranny. Some contemporary cultural commentators have found prescient warnings that bear on our own historical moment and political situation in his description of how this occurs. In this seminar we will consider what Plato has to teach us about democracy, tyranny and the character of the tyrant. We will read the Gorgias and the Republic, along with related contemporary discussions. We will consider Plato's characterization and criticisms of democracy, and ask about the extent to which they apply to the democracies we know. We will assess the plausibility of the connections that he draws between features of democracy and its vulnerability to the tyrant. In addition, we will consider the implications of his treatment of the tyrant for issues in moral philosophy.

Plato on Democracy and Tyranny
TTH2:00-3:20pm

Instructor(s): Chloe Thurston
Political Science

Description:

This course examines various types of inequalities - in representation, in participation, and in resources - and their consequences for American politics and democracy. After surveying theoretical debates on the relationship of equality and democracy we will explore how social scientists have attempted to a variety of related questions: What are the consequences of the way electoral institutions are structured for representation and policy? Do policymakers weigh the concerns of their constituents equally? Do wealthier individuals or corporations have greater influence in the political system than ordinary voters?

Political Inequality
TTH2:00-3:20pm

Instructor(s): Richard Walker
Economics

Description:

In this seminar we will survey disparate topics in politics, philosophy and economics. Exactly what we end up covering will depend a little on what most piques the interest of the group, but provisional topics include the median voter theorem, the Condorcet paradox, Arrow's impossibility theorem, the trolley problem, Rawls' theory of justice, Peter Singer and speciesism, the ethics of nationalism, the economic effects of immigration, the simulation hypothesis, how economists and regular people think about risk and uncertainty, prediction markets and the wisdom of crowds, the pros and cons of a basic income policy.

Topics in Politics, Philosophy and Economics
MW12:30-1:50pm

Instructor(s): Larry Stuelpnagel
Political Science

Description:

Presidents, politicians and citizens often claim that the press is either “liberal” or “conservative.” But many factors drive what the public receives as news. Those factors include: the economics of the business, information biases that come from striving to be “objective,” work routines by journalists, and the need to tell a story in a simple fashion so that readers and viewers can easily understand the subject. The media landscape is also now more fragmented than ever and many publishers that are pursuing political issues are also reporting more tabloid stories that are driven by clicks and Facebook "likes." This course will critically examine assumptions regarding how news is reported, how politicians attempt to manipulate the news and how this impacts the outcome of elections, policies and the perception of political players.

The Press & the Political Process
TTH12:30-1:50pm

Instructor(s): Claire Sufrin
Jewish Studies

Description:

As the course title suggests, when Jews and Christians get together we expect them to joking around about practices like wearing prayer shawls, not eating pork, or abstaining from sex. But what happens when Jews and Christians try to talk together in a serious way about the Bible? Or what happens when we die? Or even about the nature of God? In this class, we will consider whether it is possible for people from different faith traditions to learn from one another in a way that is constructive and meaningful while still respecting the differences between them. We will begin with a historical example of an interfaith dialogue gone awry and then turn to examples of contemporary religious thinkers trying to understand the purpose and possibility of interfaith dialogue. While our focus will be on Jews and Christians, our texts will include some Muslim writers as well. In short: this course is a chance to think about how to talk about our highest values and commitments with those who don’t share them.

A Rabbi and a Priest walk into a bar to talk about God
MW11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Brett Gadsen
History

Description:

How did Lyndon B. Johnson, a son of the Texas Hill Country and a product of the Jim Crow South, become the standard bearer of presidential liberalism? Faced with an intransigent Congress, how did he win groundbreaking civil rights legislation and a great expansion of the American welfare state? This course is designed to answer these questions and explore what lessons can we apply from Johnson’s political career to the current political climate? This course will pay particular attention to the evolving relationship between Johnson and the rising tide of black freedom struggles in the post-World War II. It will focus particular attention to the ways in which grassroots demands for political and economic rights were translated into public policy against the backdrop of a political structure marked up separation of powers, federalism, and entrenched white supremacy. In the final weeks of the semester, students will consider Johnson’s political legacy in subsequent presidential administrations and the contested memories surrounding his presidency.

Race and the American Presidency
TTH3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Penny Hirsch
Writing Program

Description:

What do we learn when we hear stories from people who are marginalized by society – or when we write about our own experiences with marginalization? The goal of this seminar is to answer those questions while becoming more enlightened and skillful writers ourselves. Toward that end, we will read narratives of survival and protest by people who have been marginalized by race, gender, poverty, politics, religion, war, or prison. As we do this reading, we will also look at (a) philosophical issues, such as the relationship between stories and “truth” (what’s the line between fiction and non-fiction?) and (b) literary issues, such as whether mainstream stories are any different from “stories from the margins.” Then, focusing particularly on narratives related to our country’s astonishingly high rate of incarceration, we will examine the power of stories to reshape our understanding of contemporary issues, including marginalization and inclusion at Northwestern. Papers will involve analysis of personal experience, such as how you have benefited from, or have been challenged by, marginalization, as well as analysis and arguments based on research, exploring whether or how stories from the margin challenge our views of ourselves and the world.

Reading & Writing Stories from the Margin
MWF9:00-9:50am

Instructor(s): Ivy Wilson
English

Description:

In the last few years, American audiences far and wide have been mesmerized by the Broadway play Hamilton, a theatrical work that is not only performed as a rap but is hardly imaginable without the hip hop cultures that animate it. Decades earlier in the 1990s, however, commentators including the president disparaged rap music as a non-art form. How did hip hop move from the streets to main street, from counter-cultural to pop culture? This course explores the allure of hip hop not only within the social contexts of contemporary history but within the aesthetic frameworks of poetry and poetics. More specifically, by accentuating the question of literary genre, this course investigates how hip how takes on any number of poetic forms including epic, elegy, and the lyric, among others. In so doing, this course asks us to consider how poetic forms help us understand the content of hip hop and also address how hip hop’s plasticity often eludes formal conventions

The Rhyming Apparatus: Hip Hop as Poetry
TTH3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Gary Fine
Sociology

Description:

This freshman seminar is designed to expose incoming students to the basic approaches that historians, political scientists, and sociologists use to understanding historical memory. In particular, we examine how reputations are constructed by the public and by historians, and how scandals (including contemporary ones) come to be understood. Our primary focus for this course will be American examples, but the historical range will be broad, covering 1700-present. Given the controversy recently uncovered at Northwestern about the involvement of our founder, John Evans in the Sand Creek Massacre, the most significant genocide of native peoples on United States soil, we will discuss how the university should recall Evans' deeds.

Scandals & Reputations
TTH3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Larry Trzupek
Chemistry

Description:

In this course we will read and discuss works on technical subjects written for a general audience with no special scientific training; the authors we'll be reading include Sam Kean, John McPhee, Don Norman, Richard Rhodes, Nate Silver and Lewis Thomas. Although the course is not targeted exclusively to science majors, students enrolling in it should have enough of a background in the fundamental sciences to feel comfortable writing about technical topics.

Science & Technology Writing for the Lay Aud
MWF10:00-10:50am

Instructor(s): Eric Mosser
Biological Sciences

Description:

Sleep is both mysterious and essential. Essentially all multicellular animals sleep. People can reject food and abstain from sex, but cannot help falling asleep. The vital need for, and strong evolutionary conservation of sleep indicates that it meets a fundamental need, but what functions sleep serves, and how it is regulated are still open questions. Sleep deprivation and circadian rhythm disruptions like jet lag and shift work have been demonstrated to affect immune function and may be linked to obesity. Sleep disorders have become so pervasive that The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have declared that they constitute a public health epidemic. This course will examine the neurobiological basis and societal relevance of sleep and sleep disorders.

Sleep
TTH3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Jeff Rice
Political Science

Description:

Not a day seems to go by without some student protest against a speaker trying to appear on a college campus. Students are deeply engaged in current political controversies such as Black Life Matters, cultural appropriation, multiculturalism, the Middle East etc. In 1964 student protesters shut down the University of California Berkeley demanding the right of free speech on campus. Today some students are demanding what appears to be the opposite, enforced limits on who gets to speak on campuses. We are also watching the emergence of demands for boycotts of groups or people associated with Israel (BDS). What was and is really going on with these protests: historical contexts, the nature of demands, definitions of free speech, political neutrality v. engagement, and the expectations of what the university exists to do. Are students going to far, are universities failing in their responsibility to provide intellectual leadership to guide students through these moments. This class will address these issues from the present as well as the past. We will try and isolate the relevant categories and put aside some of the rhetoric, which only confuses the real issues. We will look at some universities in particular (Northwestern amongst them).

Student Protest: From the 60s to the Present Day
TTH9:30-10:50am

Instructor(s): Karrie Snyder
Sociology

Description:

This course examines the experiences of young people today and how the experience of being a young person varies greatly by socio-economic status, gender, and race/ethnicity.   We will also spend time looking at how life stages associated with youth (such as tween, teenager, and emerging adulthood) have evolved and why the road to adulthood is often longer today.  We will also think about how the media shapes societal views of young people and how young people use social media.  Finally, we will consider how the lives of young people today (Millenials) compare to earlier generations (including Baby Boomers and Generation X) and we will look at intergenerational interactions at home, in school, and in the workplace.

Teens, Tweens and Adolescents
MW11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Lenaghan
Writing Program

Description:

Media hoaxes, copies, and remixes have existed for centuries. But is anything different about these phenomena in our digital age? For instance, since it’s so easy to copy and remix digital data, do we do so more often? Do people feel pressure to make things up because they must produce content more frequently, faster, and across more platforms than ever before? Do technology and its crowd-sourcing capabilities render lies and thefts easier to uncover? In this course, we will explore answers to these questions as we examine several historic and contemporary examples of hoaxes, copies, and remixes. We’ll ask questions about both the positive and negative aspects of such examples with the ultimate aim of discovering what they can show us about broader concepts such as individuality, uniqueness, and authenticity. Students will also have the opportunity to engage in independent research on a hoax, theft, or remix of their choosing.

Truth in Representation: Hoaxes, Copies & Remixes
TTH11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Oya Topcuoglu
Middle Eastern and North African Studies

Description:

In this course we will explore the complex relationships between food, culture and society through a survey of Turkish cuisine and food culture from the early Ottoman period through today. Food represents an integral part of livelihood, culture and identity. Food production, consumption and sharing also have symbolic and ideological meanings. By exploring the ingredients, recipes, and tools that are essential to Turkish cooking, we will take a close look at the different geographical regions, climates, ethnic and religious communities, as well as historical and cultural phenomena that make up this extremely diverse cuisine. Special topics include Ottoman palace cuisine; regional cuisines of Turkey; street food; history of coffee and coffee houses in the Ottoman Empire and Europe; spices and trade routes; Turkish food in world literature; and the effects of wars and immigrants on the formation of Turkish food culture. The course will also include a cooking/food component (either a visit to a Turkish restaurant in Chicago or a hands-on cooking experience for students). 

We are what we eat: Turkish Food Culture and Cuisine
TTH11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Shana Bernstein
Legal Studies

Description:

In this course we will examine the history of the U.S. West as both frontier and region, real and imagined. We will consider topics such as Indian Removal, wars of conquest, law, immigration and migration, race, gender, nationality, class, and environment. Much of our focus will be on the role mythology has played shaping memories and understandings of the region.

The U.S. West
MW11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Jennifer Lackey
Philosophy

Description:

In this course, we will look at questions about what we value, what we ought to value, whether there are objective values, and what makes something valuable through an examination of some fundamental philosophical problems. We will pay particular attention to the role that power dynamics play in value-driven disagreements, regarding, for example, mass incarceration, abortion, euthanasia, affirmative action, and animal rights. Students will be expected to have: Familiarity with central philosophical concepts. The ability to employ these concepts in arguments.

Values and Power
TTH11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Joseph Walsh
Biological Sciences

Description:

One of the major challenges of our changing world is the loss of biological diversity. An overwhelming majority of people agree that we should work to save biodiversity, but their views are largely based on vague, positive feelings about nature rather than concrete justifications. This course investigates those concrete justifications. The first half of the course sketches out the argument for preserving biodiversity (i.e., “thinking globally”). The second half of the course focuses on the practice of ecological restoration in forest preserves a few miles from campus (i.e., “acting locally”) not merely as a way to preserve biodiversity, but as a path to redefining a sustainable relationship between nature and culture. The readings for the course range from classics of environmental writing to recent research papers in the primary scientific literature. Biodiversity also needs to be experienced directly, so we will take a field trip to a local forest preserve where we will roll up our sleeves and help restore a native habitat and see how much biodiversity means to the people with whom we live and work.

The Values of Biodiversity
MW3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Axel Mueller
Philosophy

Description:

In this seminar, we will examine some of the fundamental ideas and questions behind democracy and provide a reading of their "inventors". Some of the questions are: What is democracy? Is it a form of government, a value, an ideal, a political system, a form of life, a bit of all this? Is democracy always the best political solution (in wartime? general starvation?)? Why should the whole of the people decide and not the specialists in the respective questions? Are all democratically taken decisions automatically legitimate (what about minorities' rights?)? How should all citizens in a democracy participate in politics? By direct self-government of the people or by voting representatives? Is everything democratically decidable or does the individual have unalterable rights? Is tolerance and/or free speech necessary for democracy and how far can it go?

What is Democracy?
MW3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Sara Hernandez
Economics

Description:

In this seminar, we will look into the many different facets of the economics of gender. We will learn about economic decisions that individuals and households face from a unique gender perspective and ask ourselves: do women and men behave differently in economic circumstances? The topics we will cover include, among others: the status of women around the world, education, marriage, fertility, labor supply, bargaining power, and discrimination. For each topic, we will study concrete examples emanating from all over the world. Students will learn to use a wide variety of academic and not-so-academic resources (including empirical research articles, ethnographic descriptions, and popular press books).

When Gender Matters in Economics
TTH12:30-1:50pm

Instructor(s): Daley Kutzman
Economics

Description:

Economists believe in the power of markets to lead us to optimal and efficient outcomes. In this seminar, we will examine why and when markets work well at an introductory level, but then explore why and how they fail. This framework will be applied to a variety of contexts (both domestic and international) for rich debates about the role of policy in a variety of economic issues, such as climate change and health insurance, among others.

When Markets Fail
MW3:30-4:50pm

Instructor(s): Sean Ebels Duggan
Philosophy

Description:

One prevalent picture of action is this: we desire things, and action is the motion we take in order to fulfill out desires. This view of why we act is compelling, but also very problematic. In this class we'll examine this view as it appears in Augustine of Hippo, and then see how it is developed in female philosophers writing at the turn of the 18th century. We then turn to other traditions for alternate conceptions of how to think of action and personhood: the Buddhist philosopher Nagarjuna, Akan philosophy from Ghana, and finally Confucius and his followers from China.

Why Do We Do What We Do? A Global View
MW9:30-10:50am

Instructor(s): Patricia Nichols
Spanish & Portuguese

Description:

mmigration has become one of the ‘hot’ buttons of contemporary social and political dialogue. Through the prism of the Latina experience in the United States, this class will explore causes and consequences of global migration in the 21st century, analyze the marginalization of third-world immigrants in first-world society, and seek to develop an understanding of the evolving ‘face’ of America.  Students will further examine how their own ancestral experiences have helped shape their perceptions of this new world order. Latina immigrants to the U.S. often leave intolerable circumstances and brave life-threatening border crossings in pursuit of the American dream. Yet, those who succeed in crossing the geographic border almost inevitably find that the marginalized existence they hoped to leave behind takes on an equally powerful form in their new world as they confront economic, political, racial, linguistic, and cultural barriers ‘north’ of the border. This course considers these issues through analysis of literature and film and has three thematic divisions: GLOBAL BORDERS includes a brief history of U.S. immigration policy and politics and analyzes its impact on global transmigration in the post- 9/11 world. CROSSING BORDERS explores the reasons for and dangers involved in border crossings by Latinas into the United States. NEW BORDERS reflects on the challenges and triumphs for Latinas once they have reached their new homeland and what it means to cross ‘borders’.

Women at the Border: The Marginalization of Latina
MWF2:00-2:50pm

Instructor(s): Ginger Pennington
Psychology

Description:

In this seminar, we will explore perspectives on femininity and what it means to be “female,” with a particular emphasis on the ways in which modern society exerts influence on the self-concepts of young women.  In the wake of such events as the Women’s March on Washington and highly-publicized sexual harassment allegations against major political and media figures, women are confronted with conflicting messages about the nature and impact of “girl power.”  Do today’s young women feel more empowered than previous generations?  Does the modern woman have the power to“choose her own definition of femininity?  Do the media and marketers “sell” feminism, shaping girls’ understanding of their own sexuality, social roles, and future opportunities?  We will read work by psychologists, sociologists, ethnographers, and other scholars who present divergent points of view on gender roles and feminist psychology.  Students will be encouraged to engage in the spirited exchange of ideas on these issues and integrate the readings with their own lived experience. 

Women Warriors and Riot Grrrls: Being Female in the 21st Century
MW11:00am-12:20pm

Instructor(s): Marcia Gealy
Writing Program

Description:

In this seminar we shall read selected fiction, poems, and essays and respond to them in writing as a way of clarifying our ideas and communicating them effectively to others. Writing assignments will include response papers to the reading and three essays of varying length.  Some of the authors we shall study are William Blake, Franz Kafka, Alice Munro, Marjane Satrapi, and Raymond Carver.

Writing about Literature & Experience
MWF10:00-10:50am
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